Microbiology, Metagenomics and Bioinformatics

Johan Bengtsson-Palme, University of Gothenburg

Browsing Posts tagged Job

Today, I started my new position at the University of Gothenburg as a non-tenured assistant professor (forskarassistent)*. In essence, this means that I have a position funded by my own grant until the end of 2020, although I will be on a leave-of-absence while doing my PostDoc with Jo Handelsman in Wisconsin. Speaking of which, I will be leaving to the US on Thursday next week for a month of setting things up at her lab (and also going to the EDAR4 conference in Lansing). I will return to Sweden in mid-September and leave for the US for real early next year.

In terms of actual work, this change of position will not mean very much at the moment. I will continue to do the same things for some time, and I will remain closely associated with Joakim Larsson’s lab at the Dept. of Infectious Diseases. And luckily, I will retain my lovely roommates for at least the time being. In the long run, however, this means that I will shift my research focus slightly, away from antibiotic resistance risk management towards interactions in microbial communities (still related to antibiotics though). Exciting times ahead!

Note
* For some reason, the university administration refuses to call this position assistant professor in English at this time, instead referring to the position as “Postdoctoral research fellow”. I guess that it might be bloody annoying explaining that this is not the same as “postdoctoral researcher” and virtually everywhere else would be called “(non-tenured) assistant professor”, but then on the other hand, who cares about titles anyway?

If you’re looking for super-interesting jobs within bioinformatics, you don’t need to look any further. Instead, you should apply for a position at 1928 Diagnostics here in Gothenburg and join them in the fight against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The position is in the development team and the deadline for application is December 19. All the details can be found here.

If you’re looking for a PhD position in bioinformatics, working with antibiotic resistance, there’s an opening in Erik Krisiansson’s (best bioinformatician in Gothenburg? I think so) group. To apply you need to have a master’s level degree in bioinformatics, mathematical statistics, mathematics, computer science, physics, molecular biology or any equivalent topic, obtained latest June 2014. If you’re a master student and want to join us, this is your chance! You can read more and apply for the position here.

A poor excuse…

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I feel very sorry that I have been a little bit unresponsive for the last couple of weeks. I have received several questions regarding the PETKit and ITSx that i have not yet got around to answer. I am very sorry for that inconvenience. The reason (not a good excuse, but still) is that I have been overloaded with grant applications. This will continue through the rest of september, so please be patient until October if I don’t reply e-mails. If you need a quick response, please state so very clearly, and I might be able to squeeze you in before the start of October. Otherwise, see you at the other end of the tunnel! Thanks for the understanding.

Our new home

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Last Friday, our research group moved into our new facilities at the Department of Infectious Diseases. I am very happy with my new room and my new view, both depicted below.

Our new affiliation is:

Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg

Postal address:
Avd. för Klinisk bakteriologi/Virologi
Guldhedsgatan 10
SE-413 46 Göteborg

The Core Facilites at Sahlgrenska are looking for a skilled bioinformatician that can support research projects employing the Core Facilites’ services. The employee will e.g. deal with setting up analysis pipelines for next generation sequencing data. They (of course) want an experienced bioinformatician, who also knows programming (Java, C and/or C++, and scripting languages such as Perl or Python). It is also preferable if the applicant knows how to set up secure systems and manage work with the Unix/Linux terminal. More on the position can be found at GU’s web site. The application time closes on the 17th of September.

So, last week I started my Ph.D. in Joakim Larsson’s group at the Sahlgrenska Academy. While I am very happy about how things have evolved, I will also miss the ecotox group and the functional genomics group a lot (though both do their research within 10 minutes walking distance from my new place…) I spent last week getting through the usual administrative hassle; getting keys and cards, signing papers, installing bioinformatics software on my new monster of a computer etc. Slowly, the new room starts to feel like it is mine (after nailing phylogenetic trees, my favorite map of the amino acids, and my remember-why-Cytoscape-visualisation-might-not-be-a-good-idea-for-all-network-like-structures poster to the billboard).

So what will this change of positions mean? Will I quit doing research on microbial communities? Of course not! In my new position, my subject of investigation will be bacterial communities subjected to antibiotics. We will look for resistance genes in such communities, and try to answer questions like: How do a high antibiotic selection pressure affect abundance of resistance genes and mobile elements that could facilitate their transfer between bacteria? Can resistance genes found in environmental bacteria be transferred to the microbes of the human gut? Can the environmental bacteria tell us what resistance genes that will be present in clinical situations in the near future? All these questions could, at least partially, be answered by metagenomic approaches and good bioinformatics tools, and my role will be to come up with the solutions provide answers to them.

I am excited over this new project, which involves my favorite subject – metagenomics and community analysis – as well as important factors, such as the clinical connections, the possibility to add pieces to the antibiotic resistance puzzle, and the role of gene and species transfer in resistance development. I also like the fact that I will need to handle high-throughput  sequence data, meaning that there will be many opportunities to develop tools, a task I highly enjoy. I think the next couple of years will be an exciting time.