Tag: Antibiotics

13 papers published on antibiotics in feed

Last week, I published 13 (!!) papers in the EFSA Journal on how to assess concentrations of antibiotics that could select for antibiotic resistance in animal feed (1-13). Or, well, you could also look at it as that the EFSA Biohaz panel that I have been a part of for more than two years published our final 13-part report.

Regardless of how you view it, this set of papers have two main takeaways:

  1. We present a method to establish Predicted Minimal Selective Concentrations (PMSCs) for antibiotics. This method uses a combination of Dan Andersson’s approach to MSCs (14) and the method I published with Joakim Larsson around five years ago to establish predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for antibiotics based on MIC data (15). The combination is a powerful (but very cautious) tool to estimate minimal selective concentrations for antibiotics (1), and we have subsequently applied this method to animal feed contamination with antibiotics, but…
  2. There is way too little data to establish PMSCs for most antibiotics with any certainty. Really, the lack of data is so bad that for many of the antibiotic classes we could not make a reasonable assessment. Thus the main conclusion might be that we need a lot more data on how low concentrations of antibiotics that select for antibiotic resistance, both in laboratory systems and in more realistic settings.

References

  1. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 1: Methodology, general data gaps and uncertainties. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6852 [Paper link]
  2. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 2: Aminoglycosides/aminocyclitols: apramycin, paromomycin, neomycin and spectinomycin. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6853 [Paper link]
  3. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 3: Amprolium. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6854 [Paper link]
  4. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 4: ß-Lactams: amoxicillin and penicillin. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6855 [Paper link]
  5. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 5: Lincosamides: lincomycin. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6856 [Paper link]
  6. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 6: Macrolides: tilmicosin, tylosin and tylvalosin. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6858 [Paper link]
  7. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 7: Amphenicols: florfenicol and thiamphenicol. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6859 [Paper link]
  8. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 8: Pleuromutilins: tiamulin and valnemulin. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6860 [Paper link]
  9. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 9: Polymyxins: colistin. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6861 [Paper link]
  10. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 10: Quinolones: flumequine and oxolinic acid. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6862 [Paper link]
  11. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 11: Sulfonamides. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6863 [Paper link]
  12. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 12: Tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, and doxycycline. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6864[Paper link]
  13. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ)*, Allende A, Koutsoumanis K, Alvarez-Ordóñez A, Bolton D, Bover-Cid S, Chemaly M, Davies R, De Cesare A, Herman L, Hilbert F, Lindqvist R, Nauta M, Ru G, Simmons M, Skandamis P, Suffredini E, Andersson DI, Bampidis V, Bengtsson-Palme J, Bouchard D, Ferran A, Kouba M, López Puente S, López-Alonso M, Saxmose Nielsen S, Pechová A, Petkova M, Girault S, Broglia A, Guerra B, Lorenzo Innocenti M, Liébana E, López-Gálvez G, Manini P, Stella P, Peixe L: Maximum levels of cross-contamination for 24 antimicrobial active substances in non-target feed. Part 13: Trimethoprim. EFSA Journal, 19, 10 (2021). doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2021.6865 [Paper link]
  14. Gullberg E, Cao S, Berg OG, Ilbäck C, Sandegren L, Hughes D, et al.: Selection of resistant bacteria at very low antibiotic concentrations. PLoS Pathogens 7, e1002158 (2011). doi: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1002158
  15. Bengtsson-Palme J, Larsson DGJ: Concentrations of antibiotics predicted to select for resistant bacteria: Proposed limits for environmental regulation. Environment International, 86, 140-149 (2016). doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2015.10.015 [Paper link]

Open PhD position

We are hiring a PhD student to work with interactions between the bacteria in human and environmental microbiomes that are important for community stability and resilience to being colonized by unwanted bacteria (including pathogens). The project seeks to unearth which environmental and genetic factors that are important determinants of bacterial invasiveness and community stability. You can read more at our Open Positions page.

We are looking for a candidate with experience with both bioinformatics and experimental microbiology. Previous experience with microbial communities is a plus, but not a must, as is work with human cell lines.

The project is fully funded by a grant from the Swedish Research Council and the position is planned for 4.5 years, with 4 years of research and course work and half a year of teaching.

If you feel that you are the right person for this position, you can apply hereWe look forward to your application! The deadline for applications is October 21.

Funding from the research council!

I am very happy to share the news that our starting grant application to the Swedish Research Council has been granted 3.3 million SEK of funding for four years! This is fantastic news, as it allows us to further explore the interactions between bacteria in the human microbiome that are important for community stability and resilience to being colonized by pathogens. In the granted project, we will investigate environmental and genetic factors that are important for bacterial invasiveness and community stability in the human gastrointestinal tract.

Within the scope of the project, we will establish model bacterial communities and experimental systems for the human stomach and intestine. We will then investigate how disturbances, such as antibiotic exposure, change the interactions in these microbial communities and their long-term stability. Finally, we aim to identify genes that contribute to successful bacterial colonization or resilience to invasion of established communities in the human microbiome.

Aside from myself, Prof. Sara Lindén and Dr. Kaisa Thorell from the University of Gothenburg as well as Prof. Ed Moore at the university’s Culture Collection will be involved in this project in different ways. We will also collaborate with my former postdoc supervisor Prof. Jo Handelsman as well as Dr. Ophelia Venturelli at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Finally, we will also collaborate with Dr. Åsa Sjöling at the Karolinska Institute. I look forward to work with you all over the coming four years! A big thanks to the Swedish Research Council for believing in this research and investing in making it happen!

The Gothenburg Society of Medicine’s research prize

I am very happy to share the news that I have been awarded with the Gothenburg Society of Medicine and the Sahlgrenska Academy’s prize to young researchers for our research on the effects of antibiotics on bacteria, including, of course, antibiotic resistance.

I am incredibly honoured by being selected for this award. I am also thrilled with that the Gothenburg Society of Medicine, which is a society mostly for medical doctors, sees the value in our broad, one-health, take on antibiotic resistance as well as other effect that antibiotics may have on microbes, both in the human body and in the environment. The recognition of antibiotic resistance as a one-health problem with solutions both within and outside of the typical medical setting is instrumental for our ability to curb future resistance development.

The award ceremony will take place in connection with the Gothenburg Society of Medicine’s closing meeting on 2 December, where I will present our research together with the senior awardee Professor Claes Ohlsson, who is awarded for his groundbreaking research on osteoporosis.

EFSA Public Consultation

For a bit more than a year, I have been part of an EFSA panel on biological hazards on cross contamination with antibiotic substances in animal feed. This week the panel has launched an open consultation on sections of the draft scientific opinion, including the proposed methodology and the data gaps identified. Anyone who are interested can submit written comments before 18 November 2020, and the full information can be found at the EFSA website.

Open postdoc position

We are hiring a postdoc to work with environmental monitoring of antimicrobial resistance. The project is part of the EMBARK program and will consider different aspects of establishing a baseline for background antibiotic resistance in the environment, standardization of monitoring protocols and development of methods to detect emerging resistance threats. The project will involve work with environmental sampling, DNA extractions, bacterial culturing and generation of large-scale DNA sequence data. In terms of bioinformatic analyses, the project will encompass analysis of next-generation sequence data, genome-resolved metagenomics, short-read assembly and network analysis.

We look for a skilled bioinformatician, preferably with experience of experimental laboratory work. If you feel that you are the right person for this position, you can apply here. More information is also available here. We look forward to your application! The deadline for applications is January 3.

EMBARK funded by JPIAMR

I am very happy to announce today (on the European Antibiotic Awareness Day), that the EMBARK project that I am coordinator for got funded by JPIAMR with almost 1.4 million Euros over three years!

The primary goal of EMBARK is to establish a baseline for how common resistance is in the environment and what resistance types that can be expected where. That background data will then underpin efforts to standardize different methods for resistance surveillance and identify high-priority targets that should be used for efficient monitoring. In addition, EMBARK will develop and evaluate methods to detect new resistance factors and thereby provide an early-warning system for emerging resistance threats.

EMBARK is an international collaboration funded by JPIAMR. The consortium consists of myself, Thomas Berendonk (TU-Dresden, Germany), Luis Pedro Coelho (Fudan University, China), Sofia Forslund (ECRC Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin, Germany), Etienne Ruppé (INSERM, France) and Rabaab Zahra (Quaid-i-Azam University, Pakistan).

EMBARK has a website where the protocols and data generated during the project will be released. Follow our progress towards better monitoring of antimicrobial resistance in the environment here and on the EMBARK Twitter account: @EMBARK_JPIAMR!

Open PhD position

We are hiring a PhD student to work with effects of antibiotics on microbial communities! The project will use large-scale techniques to investigate how sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics affect microbial communities. Specifically, the project will examine how the ability for bacteria to colonize and invade established microbial communities is impacted by antibiotics. The project will also explore how antibiotics influence the interactions between different species in bacterial communities and if this may change their ability to withstand invasions. The goal is to identify the genes and mechanisms that contribute to change and stability in microbial communities.

A cool thing about this position is that it is fairly adaptable to the eventual candidate, and the project can be somewhat tailored to suit the profile of the PhD student. This means that we’re looking for someone who is either a bioinformatician or an experimentalist (or both). Previous experience with microbial communities is a plus, but not a must.

If you feel that you are the right person for this position, you can apply here. More information is also available here. We look forward to your application! The deadline for applications is December 9.

Published book chapter: Reducing resistance in the environment

I have been slow at picking this ball up, but the book chapter that I coauthored with Stefanie Hess is now available online (and has been for almost a month). It is part of the book Antibiotic Drug Resistance, edited by José-Luis Capelo-Martínez and Gilberto Igrejas and was available in print on September 9th.

Our chapter deals with sources of resistant bacteria to the environment, and in particular the roles of sewage, wastewater and agriculture in resistance dissemination. Furthermore, the chapter discusses de novo selection of resistance and defines relevant risk scenarios. Finally, we outline the different management options available and discuss their feasibility.

The chapter boils down to that the available strategies for limiting antibiotic resistance dissemination and selection in the environment are overall quite clear. Larger problems that remain to be solved are how to prioritize between different strategies, which technologies that would provide the largest benefits and to achieve the political willingness to pursue these strategies. We note that several of the most efficient resistance prevention options involve high costs, investments in technology and infrastructure in other countries or proposals that are likely to be rather unpopular with the general public. For example, investing in sewage treatment and water infrastructure in low-income countries would likely be among the most effective means to reduce releases of resistant bacteria into the environment and reduced meat consumption would contribute to lower the use of antibiotics in animal husbandry, but neither is a very popular proposal for tax payers in high-income countries.

I have not yet read the entire book myself, but the table of content shows a very wide-reaching and comprehensive picture of the antibiotic resistance field, with a range of prominent authors. The editors have made a good job collecting this many interesting book chapters in the same volume!

Reference

Bengtsson-Palme J, Heß S: Strategies to reduce or eliminate resistant pathogens in the environment. In: Capelo Martinez JL, Igrejas G (Eds.) Antibiotic Drug Resistance, 637–673. Wiley, NJ, USA (2020). doi: 10.1002/9781119282549.ch24[Link]

Thank you Alice!

This week marked the departure of our summer internship student Alice Zublena, who is now heading back to France to finish her masters program. Alice has been working on establishing effect concentrations for beta-lactam antibiotics for different bacteria, and has generated a very exciting and useful data set for our work in the coming years. I am tremendously happy that I have got to work with Alice this summer and very thankful for having the opportunity to supervise such a talented student. Thanks for your great work this summer Alice and good luck with everything you pursue in the future!